Sabbatical

I’ve regularly been posting articles - at least once per month - since 2010. This year, a few things came up that took my attention away from creating content to help technical folks get more out of their career. Firstly, I went through a particularly challenging promotion cycle that required a deliverable which consumed all of my free time. Next, I have been trying to re-balance my family and career commitments to be more present at home - kids grow up way too fast, it’s not fair. As a result, I haven’t posted since April of this year and do not plan on creating another post until 2017.

Thanks for reading and see you next year.

Drummer

Alternative to Arguing

Sometimes you’re right, and you know it. Unfortunately, we live in a world where those around us may not know what we know. Worse than that (by an order of magnitude), others around us may intellectually know they are wrong - or you are right - and fight you regardless; out of spite, or fear, or anger, or whatever.

At the end of the day, all of the logic and data in the world won’t always win others over to your way of thinking, especially if they didn’t come to their current set of conclusions using facts and logic to begin with.

When something like this happens in your world, you have two choices. First, you can dig in deeper, fighting with more logic, facts, figures, and eloquent arguments. Or, instead, you can work to understand the alternate perspective and change your communication approach to suit your audience. The latter may take more time, energy, and patience than you would like to expend, but is ultimately more effective in the long run.

One of the keys to cultivating solid relationships is the ability to identify these situations and intentionally adjust your approach when you think it will lead to a better result. This practice takes a lifetime (and then some) to master, but is worth the journey to improve on over time.

Next time you feel the other side digging in, don’t respond in kind. Instead, adjust and look to address a potential deeper issue.

How To Drastically Reduce Your PowerPoint File Size

I just tried to email a PowerPoint I was working on to a colleague for some feedback and realized, to my horror, that the file size was over 80MB. Obviously, that won’t do.

After digging around, I came to the conclusion that the massive amount of images I was using in the file had to be the issue. Going through and manually resizing each image seemed like too much of a chore though, certainly there had to be a better way. Luckily, there is!

In PowerPoint 2016 for Mac do the following:

  • Click on an image - any image will do
  • Select “Picture Format”
  • Select “Compress Pictures”
  • Select the picture quality from the dropdown
  • Ensure “Delete cropped areas of pictures” is selected
  • Choose to perform this action on the selected image(s) or all of them
  • Click OK

Resize files PowerPoint Mac

And there you have it. After doing this one simple step, my file size went from over 80MB to around 7MB. Not too shabby.